CONCEPTUAL RENDERING

CONCEPTUAL RENDERING

Designers conceptual rendering envisioning a shared use path winding through storm water ponding areas with native vegetation.

CENTENNIAL FOREST

CENTENNIAL FOREST

Prior to construction Centennial Forest was a little used area that had sustained substantial damage during the 2011 flood.

LAND DEVELOPMENT

LAND DEVELOPMENT

Construction began in August of 2016 over 100,000 cubic yards of dirt was moved in order to create the ponding area.

SITE DEVELOPMENT

SITE DEVELOPMENT

The 3000 linear foot shared use path begins to take shape in the fall of 2016.

STORM SEWER INFRASTRUCTURE

STORM SEWER INFRASTRUCTURE

During large events storm water runoff from Perkett Ditch backflows into Centennial Pond where it is detained and then released slowly

PAVED PATH AND LANDSCAPING

PAVED PATH AND LANDSCAPING

Paved shared use path and newly planted vegetation shown during a dry period.

LANDSCAPE DESIGN

LAND DEVELOPMENT

STORM SEWER

FLOOD PLANNING

CONSTRUCTION ENGINEERING

SURVEYING

DISCIPLINES INVOLVED

MINOT, ND

centennial pond/perkett ditch

As part of the interior drainage analysis for the Mouse River Enhanced Flood Protection Project, we determined that the City of Minot needed additional storm water storage capacity in order to reduce the storm water pump size needed to handle runoff from a large rain during a flooding event. Through an in-depth alternatives analysis (and some outside the box thinking), we identified the opportunity to convert Centennial Forest into Centennial Pond to create additional storm water storage capacity. Ackerman-Estvold saw this conversion of Centennial Forest as an opportunity to not only serve as a storm water detention and retention pond, but also to create an amenity for the City of Minot.

During large rain events, runoff from the 650-acre Perkett Ditch watershed will backflow into the Centennial Pond. The 45-acre-foot ponding area will detain the peak runoff during the rain event and slowly release the runoff over time. This reduced peak allows for a considerably smaller storm water pump as a part of the overall project.

 

The ongoing project envisions a pedestrian connection between the adjacent neighborhood and the existing trail system along the Highway 83 Bypass. Additionally, the native planting plan creates a lush wet meadow corridor attracting wildlife and increasing water quality. In total, the $3 million construction of Centennial Pond saved several million dollars in project costs relating to the Mouse River Enhanced Flood Protection Project.